PyGrunn is the "Python and friends" conference with
a local footprint and global mindset. Firmly rooted
in the open source culture, it aims to provide the
leading lights in advanced internet technologies, a
platform to inform, inspire and impress their peers.

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Speakers 2016

Peter Odding

Understanding PyPy and using it in production

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Peter Odding Peter Odding

Understanding PyPy and using it in production

In this presentation Bart and Peter from Paylogic will talk about the PyPy Python interpreter and JIT compiler. We’ll explain what it is, how it works and when to use it. The presentation starts with a high level introduction and then moves on to discuss some of the foundations and internals. After that we take a look at how Paylogic switched one of its production systems to PyPy and quadrupled the performance. Finally we’ll try to give you some guidelines to help you decide which of your projects can benefit from switching to PyPy.

BIO information

Peter is the team lead of Paylogic's IT operations team. His day to day job is a combination of devops, team management, contact with other departments in Paylogic and contact with external parties (technology partners). He started programming when he was twelve and he has a passion for automation, packaging and high availability. If it can be automated he will do it at some point :-).

Martijn Faassen

Morepath: Under The Hood

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Martijn Faassen Martijn Faassen

Morepath: Under The Hood

Morepath is a web framework with some interesting technologies under the hood. In particular this talk is for you if:

  • You already use a Python web framework and are curious about how they work.
  • You actually work on another web framework yourself and are curious about how they could work better.
  • You work on some non web framework and you want to learn about some new approaches.
  • Strangely enough you actually use Morepath and are curious about how it works.

BIO information

Martijn has been a Python developer since 1998. He's created and contributed to a lot of things over the years: lxml, Zope, Grok, Morepath. I also write JavaScript code and garden.

Jasper Spaans

From code to configuration... and back again

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Jasper Spaans Jasper Spaans

From code to configuration... and back again

Using Python to put business logic into an application is a natural idea if the people maintaining the business logic are programmers as well. However, we found out that after we had installed our software at several customers, we were spending way too much time on maintaining that.

This led to the first half of the title, from code to config: Create a rule engine that can accept the business logic as configuration, and allows the end user to edit the configuration through the web.

In the lab this setup worked fine, however, after installing it at a beta customer, we found out real life performance had decreased by almost a factor of 10. Even running the code using PyPy did not help us enough.

So, back to the drawing board, and time to start optimizing. We explored a bunch of options, and in the end come up with the second half of the title: a compiler written in Python that can take a configuration and generates optimized Python code.

During this talk I'll show you how we went through this process, and will also dive into the optimizations we've been able to perform using our own compiler.

BIO information

I hold a degree in rocket science, but have switched to the software industry and have been writing Python professionally for more than ten years, currently working at Fox-IT as an architect. I like tinkering with electronics, watching cat videos, and enjoy running when it drizzles.

Álex González

Python, Kubernetes and friends

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Álex González Álex González

Python, Kubernetes and friends

Containers are the past, orchestration of containers is the future. In this talk you are going to learn the basic definitions that you will find in a Kubernetes cluster and how to deploy your Python applications there.

You are going to move your app from running it in a simple container to do a rolling-update in several machines and with 0 downtime.

Don't be scared, there will be loads of examples that will help to understand the abstractions that people from Kubernetes came up with.

BIO information

Currently working at jobandtalent.com as Software Architect he spends his free time playing around with Go & everything that smells as a container. In the past he developed a Kubernetes volume plugin that is available since 1.1.

He also loves organising events and he has a good track with that co-organising (past) GolangUK 2015, the Golang London User Group & Monthly PyGrunn in the Netherlands. Now he launched madScalability group in Madrid focused on scalability issues from personal to technical.

Hugo Buddelmeijer

The orientation of your DAGs matter!

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Hugo Buddelmeijer Hugo Buddelmeijer

The orientation of your DAGs matter!

Backward Chaining the Universe in Python.

BIO information

Data scientist at the Kapteyn Astronomical Institute of the University of Groningen.

Bram Noordzij

Django Channels

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Bram Noordzij Bram Noordzij

Django Channels

Need to add real-time updates to a Django app? Prefer one obvious way to do it? Then look no further and add Django channels to the project. This talk includes an example and discusses some considerations.

BIO information

Bram Noordzij is an experienced backend engineer and had worked on several Python, Java and C-based projects. Having an interest in pushing things to their limits and beyond, he regularly nearly breaks stuff and then improves them into resilient systems.

Dmitry Chaplinsky

Python superpowers on civic society's secret service

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Dmitry Chaplinsky Dmitry Chaplinsky

Python superpowers on civic society's secret service

A talk about python, civic society, open data, crowdsourcing and tangerines. A lot of tangerines.

BIO information

I started to code with pen and paper when he was 11 and later won a few CAD/CAM/CAE contests. I'm fascinated by artificial intelligence, natural language processing, neural networks, arduino robotics, JavaScript and Python.

For the last 1.5 years I'm a part of Ukrainian NGO White Collar Hundred, where we developed a bunch of successful IT projects in the area of open data, transparency and anticorruption. All our projects are using python of course.

Here is a documentary about our effort: http://white-collar-hundred.docuspace.org/eng/

Emil Loer

Extending C programs with PyPy-powered code

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Emil Loer Emil Loer

Extending C programs with PyPy-powered code

One of the most significant contributions that the PyPy developers have brought to the Python ecosystem is the cffi package. Now with the recent release of PyPy 5 it becomes possible to use cffi to embed PyPy into a C program. This means you can extend existing non-Python software with blazingly fast Python code.

In this talk Emil Loer will show you how you can use this technique to write a PyPy-powered plugin for an existing piece of software written in C. Along the road he will explain how cffi works and what makes it so great.

BIO information

Emil Loer is a developer, entrepreneur and jazz musician. He is the owner of Codelle, an indie Mac and iOS app studio that excels at making apps for musicians. Next to that Emil does occasional consulting for companies facing the most difficult algorithmic and architectural problems. Emil has deep knowledge on software synthesis, signal processing, real-time computing and code optimisation. His Vim skills are beyond measure.

Oleg Pidsadnyi

Factory injection: Combining PyTest and FactoryBoy best practices in testing.

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Oleg Pidsadnyi Oleg Pidsadnyi

Factory injection: Combining PyTest and FactoryBoy best practices in testing.

This talk is an introduction to a new library pytest-factoryboy which I wrote and it is not well known yet, but important in my opinion. I want to increase popularity of FactoryBoy and PyTest, explain the benefits of their patterns over traditional test suites and their tools. And the most important to demonstrate Python possibilities of introspection that allow you to avoid writing code, come up with the conventions that would automate the most annoying parts of the system like tests.

BIO information

Oleg is a Python programmer at Paylogic.

Graduated from National Technical University of Ukraine in 2003, had various software engineering experience in outsourcing and switched to Python since 2006.

Oleg is an author of PyTest-BDD library and contributes to other open source projects.

His focus is on in-depth knowledge of the Python libraries and frameworks as well as on improving internal company framework and tooling that makes software development easier and more fun.

K Rain Leander

Build a Simple Cloud with TripleO Quickstart

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K Rain Leander K Rain Leander

Build a Simple Cloud with TripleO Quickstart

TripleO is an OpenStack Deployment & Management tool built using python.

With TripleO, you start by creating an undercloud (an actual operator facing deployment cloud) that will contain the necessary OpenStack components to deploy and manage an overcloud (an actual tenant facing workload cloud). The overcloud is the deployed solution and can represent a cloud for any purpose (e.g. production, staging, test, etc). The operator can choose any of available Overcloud Roles (controller, compute, etc.) they want to deploy to the environment.

One of the barriers to entry for trying out TripleO and its derivatives has been the relative difficulty in getting an environment up quickly.

The set of ansible roles at https://github.com/openstack/tripleo-quickstart is meant to help.

BIO information

K Rain Leander is a systematic, slightly psychic, interdisciplinary developer evangelist with a Bachelor’s in dance and a Master’s in IT. An epic public speaker, she has disappeared within a box stuffed with swords, created life, and went skydiving with the Queen. Seriously. Rain is an active technical contributor with OpenStack TripleO, Fedora, DjangoGirls, and Project DO. Come say hello. Bring cake.

Ben Meijering

Hello, Machine Learning!

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Ben Meijering Ben Meijering

Hello, Machine Learning!

Many big companies such as Google, Facebook, and Microsoft are investing a lot of time and resources in machine learning. Recognizing cats in video’s, people in photographs, topics in texts, words in audio; it’s all the fruits of machine learning.

If you’re a Pythonista and want to learn what machine learning is all about, you’re in luck! There are many good libraries, both for doing R&D, and for running machine learning applications in production.

In this talk I will demonstrate how to train a machine learning model to recognize handwritten digits. It’s the “hello, world” of machine learning, and surprisingly simple: the model will not be more than 10 lines of code!

BIO information

After obtaining a PhD in Artificial Intelligence, and working in the Big Data industry, I’ve become a freelance data scientist. I do consultancy, and build machine learning products.

One day, I hope to apply my skills in the gaming industry, where sensors, motion controllers, and AR/VR headsets will produce tremendous amounts of streaming data.

Dorian Hoxha

Making more money contracting with python

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Dorian Hoxha Dorian Hoxha

Making more money contracting with python

First there was a job. But the boss didn't want to raise the wage. Then there was another job. But the agility of the wage-increase still wasn't enough. And then contracting was born.

BIO information

Programmer just trying to change the world several steps at a time / Disappointed teacher.

Christian Branbergen

Dataprovider

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Christian Branbergen Christian Branbergen

Dataprovider

Dataprovider transforms the internet into a structured database to create insights about companies.

BIO information

Getrouwd met @sgdegraaf, trotse superheld van drie donderstenen en co-founder van Dataprovider. Gek op start-ups, data en code-kloppen.

Bart Wesselink

Processing large quantities of online payments

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Andrii Mishkovskyi

Vacation from Python

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Andrii Mishkovskyi Andrii Mishkovskyi

Vacation from Python

I've been writing Python professionally for 6 years straight and then just... stopped. Not that I didn't love Python, in fact quite the opposite, but I felt that I've exercised its limits. I haven't written a project in Python for almost 3 years after that, concentrating on Clojure and other JVM-based languages. Since about 3 months now I'm writing Python daily again and while it hasn't been hassle-free it's definitely a pleasant experience overall.

This talks tries to explore the reasons, both technical and less so that led me to quit Python, the things I've missed from Python in other languages and features or rather approach Python would benefit from. This is an opinionated talk, of course so expect a few eyebrow-raising sentences.

BIO information

A funny bio where I describe my experience, making sure to list all my accomplishments and self-deprecatingly describe my current work. A reference to previous talks at various conferences. A reference to the proudest project, possibly impressive to general public. Small note about open-source contributions. Well-rounded last sentence.

P.S. A pun/joke.

Sagar Panday

Demystifying Monolithic Vs Microservice architecture

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Sagar Panday Sagar Panday

Demystifying Monolithic Vs Microservice architecture

Where does the confusion arises. The Good and Bad sides of both the styles. Suitability, best practices and the best options available in Python. Comparative viewpoints of different Python based frameworks (Django, Falcon, Flask, Bottle, etc.) for building rest APIs via both the architectures.

BIO information

A Consultant by profession and a Hacker at heart , Sagar is a Python lover and a open source enthusiast . Self learned python developer has attended 20+ Hackathons and won 3 major ones . All his project are full stack Python based web application and he has worked on almost all major and the lesser known Python frameworks and libraries. Find out more about him at http://aigeano.github.io

Steven Pemberton

The Future of Programming

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Steven Pemberton Steven Pemberton

The Future of Programming

We're doing it wrong. In the time since the internet was introduced in the Netherlands, personal computers have become about 500 000 times faster, but we as programmers are hardly any more productive. How can this be? What are we doing wrong? Can we make ourselves even 10 times more productive?

BIO information

Steven co-designed the programming language that Python is based on. Since then he has been involved with the Web from the beginning, helping to design CSS, HTML and a bunch of other technologies.

Boaz Leskes

Elasticsearch for SQL users

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Boaz Leskes Boaz Leskes

Elasticsearch for SQL users

Most developers are familiar with relational databases and its query language, SQL. We know how to model our data so it can fit the relational paradigm and we know how to query this relational data using SQL.

Elasticsearch is a document store with its own query DSL. In this talk we will look at several well-understood concepts and SQL queries from the relational paradigm and map these to their Elasticsearch equivalents. Using a concrete example, we will discuss possible data models and their implications to query speeds and indexing. Last we will talk about the Aggregation framework of Elasticsearch. Next be a powerful source of insights and analytics, it can be a surprising tool to do SQL like joins.

If you are someone with a solid grasp of the relational world and looking to map your mental model to the document-oriented search world, this talk is for you!

BIO information

Boaz is lead developer of Elasticsearch Marvel and the author of Sense, the popular front end for Elasticsearch. Boaz's background is diverse, ranging from C++ to C#, Python, Java, and sometimes even JavaScript. Based in Amsterdam, he's a fan of faceting, Lucene, monitoring, and search.

Github: http://github.com/bleskes

Twitter: bleskes

Daan Vielen

How to survive your fellow team members and managers

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Daan Vielen Daan Vielen

How to survive your fellow team members and managers

There are a lot of challenges when working in a team. In my years as a developer I've seen projects succeed and fail. The way a team worked together was mostly the key factor.

I'll share some tips and tricks I've picked up when working in a team. This talk will provide a couple of best practices, technical as well as organisational.

What can you do as a developer to get the most out of yourself and your team. How to survive the angry-managers, self-proclaimed-developer-rockstars, shy-beginners and moody-CEO's. The good and the bad of codereviews, unittesting, pairprogramming and planning.

BIO information

I'm a freelance python developer for about 10 years now. I've worked for a lot of companies, small and large, working alone and working in big teams.

Jelle Feringa

PythonOCC & industrial robotics for the building industry

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Jelle Feringa Jelle Feringa

PythonOCC & industrial robotics for the building industry

Building software to build amazing buildings!

So over the past 4 years I've been developing our in-house robotics software on top of PythonOCC. I'd love to talk about how PythonOCC is a great platform to take part in changing the building industry. here's a recent article [1] we're wrapping up the new HQ for Lego [2]

I think it would be cool to speak about the parallel of building pythonocc vs setting up a company that explores its potential. this is known for web technologies, but to a lesser extent in robotics / CAD / BIM

[1] https://www.dropbox.com/s/h0c6as799rbnblq/nrc_robots_laten_architecten_zelf_bouwen_may_2015.pdf?dl=1 [2] http://domusweb.it/en/news/2011/12/01/kirk-kapital-a-s-by-eliasson.html

BIO information

Jelle Feringa is co-founder & CTO of Odico formwork robotics, based in Odense, Denmark.

He is a founding partner in EZCT Architecture & Design Research. The work of the office is widely exhibited, exhibitions include the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Archilab, Orléans, Barbican Gallery, London Design Miami/Basel and the Centre Pompidou, Paris.

Jelle is an active contributor to  open source software. With Thomas Paviot, he has been driving the development of an open source CAD framework, PythonOCC.

Reinout van Rees

Improve your Django admin

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Reinout van Rees Reinout van Rees

Improve your Django admin: Big gains with little effort

The django admin is a much-loved killer feature of django. With two lines, you can add one of your own database models to the admin so that you can edit your data. But.... the admin can do so much more for you with a little extra configuration. A full-text search field for your objects only takes one line! The django documentation (of course) explains it all, but if you come to my talk, I'll show you what is possible. Then you'll know what to look for in the documentation. With one or two hours work you can get VERY happy users or colleagues. Lots of happiness for relatively little work!

BIO information

Civil engineer by education, programmer by experience. Maker of summaries: just google for "pygrunn" and "reinout", for instance. Doing lots of python behind-the-scenes automation + working on django projects: all for water management in the Netherlands and abroad.

Location

PyGrunn 2016 will take place on May 13th at Groninger Forum, the old Forum Images building, in Groningen.

Groninger Forum is a cultural living and working environment. A place where artists, creative people, entrepreneurs and enthusiasts can meet. A perfect spot for PyGrunn! It is a 3-minute walk from the central train station and in the heart of the city.

Address
Hereplein 73, 9711 GD Groningen
Phone
+31 50 312 0433

Tickets

Schedule 2016

  • Start End 1 (cellar) 2 (ground floor) 3 (2nd floor) 4 (2nd floor)
    9:00 Reception
    Welcome speech
    Lars de Ridder
    MicroPython: Internet of Pythonic things?
    Andrii Mishkovskyi
    Vacation From Python
    Álex González
    Python, Kubernetes and friends
    Henk Doornbos
    Python blockchained
    Berco Beute
    State of the software union
    Oleg Pidsadnyi
    Factory injection: Combining PyTest and Fact
    Emil Loer
    Extending C programs with PyPy-powered code
    Boaz Leskes
    Elasticsearch for SQL users
    Reinout van Rees
    Improve your django admin: big gains with little effort
    Lunch
    Bram Noordzij & Bob Voorneveld
    Django channels
    Jelle Feringa
    PythonOCC & industrial robotics for the building industry
    Ben Meijering
    Hello, Machine Learning!
    Peter Odding/Bart Kroon
    Understanding PyPy and using it in production
    Hugo Buddelmeijer
    The orientation of your DAGs matter!
    Daan Vielen
    How to survive your fellow team members and managers
    Catawiki
    TBA
    Dmitry Chaplinsky
    Python superpowers on civic society's secret service.
    K Rain Leander
    Build a Simple Cloud with TripleO Quickstart
    Break
    Bart Wesselink
    Processing large quantities of online payments
    Jasper Spaans
    From code to configuration... and back again
    VacanSoleil
    TBA
    Sagar Pandey
    Demystifying Monolithic Vs Microservice architecture
    Dorian Hoxha
    Making more money contracting with python
    TBA
    TBA
    Martijn Faassen
    KEYNOTE
    Drinks
    Late Speakers dinner
  • Start End Launch Cafe Cafe nearby Cafe in the city center
    10:00 10:30 Forming teams, announcing things to do
    10:30 13:00 Sprinting!
    13:00 14:00 Lunch
    14:00 18:00 Sprinting!
    18:00 18:30 Team reports
    18:30 22:00 Closing the day [Party]
  • Start End Launch Cafe Cafe nearby Cafe in the city center
    10:00 10:30 Forming teams, announcing things to do
    10:30 13:00 Sprinting!
    13:00 14:00 Lunch
    14:00 18:00 Sprinting!
    18:00 18:30 Team reports
    18:30 22:00 Closing the day [Party]

Sprints

After the success of the previous years sprints, this year PyGrunn will again sprint! We feel that sprints are an excellent way to contribute to the open source community from which PyGrunn emerged. As most of us are software developers, it's important to be able to sit face to face and work together on open-source projects on which we worked during the year. Discuss the future, build new features, fix bugs, and hack on some experiment. The sprints are also a great opportunity to hang around with peers, talk tech, and have fun!

Topics

We are currently deciding on the topics to sprint on. Please contribute by voting for existing topics or propose your own using the form. In the latter case you should have a core project developer in mind that can join the sprint.

Venue

Sprints are planned at May 14 and 15 (the saturday and sunday after the conference day) from 10:00 till 22:00 at the Launch Cafe Groningen.

More photos of the venue can be found here and here. Μore information about this wonderful venue can be found at the venue's site. The venue is equipped with wifi, projectors, and whiteboards. Coffee, tea, beer and snacks will be provided.

Join us and make that change. Be a grunner amongst PyGrunners!

Schedule

The schedule is the same for both sprint days.

10:00-10:30
Forming teams, announcing things to do
10:30-13:00
Sprinting!
13:00-14:00
Lunch @ cafe nearby
14:00-18:00
Sprinting!
18:00-18:30
Team reports
18:30-22:00
Closing the day [Party]

Request For Proposals 2016

This is your chance to share your work with the PyGrunn community! Let us know your proposal for a talk at PyGrunn 2016.

All talks are 30 minutes and should inspire, impress and inform. Try to use the full 30 minutes to inspire your audience and save the discussions for the time between talks.

Topics

As the tagline says, PyGrunn is about Python and friends, so talks don't have to be about Python per se. But they should have some connection to Python. The audience is technically quite skilled so adjust your talk accordingly.

Speakers get free access. You don't have to buy a ticket if you speak at PyGrunn!

Please mail any questions you may have to info@pygrunn.org. You can send us any remarks you may have using the additional information field in the form.

Share your tips for 2016

About

PyGrunn is the largest conference in The Netherlands dedicated to Python and Friends. PyGrunn has always been a special gathering for enthousiasts and for those who wish to share their knowledge and passion about Python and related technologies. Its purpose is to provide a pleasant experience to every attendant. We are both excited and proud to present our sponsors, a list of former PyGrunn speakers and (if present) their recorded talk, and a few photographic moments of the latest edition of PyGrunn.

Code of Conduct

At PyGrunn, we don't believe in the need for a formal code of conduct, as there should be no need to codify good behaviour. We expect everyone to behave with common decency and we expect that everyone is treated with equal respect. PyGrunn staff will take any measures necessary to uphold these golden rules of life.

Sponsors

Kryptonite

Your company could be here!

Gold

Our world is an unimaginable large store of locked up potential. Almost every object contains more data and functionality (‘kunnis‘) than is currently accessible to others. As of yet the overwhelming majority of the kunnis of the world is still untapped. Imagine a world where the kunnis of every object is made easily and safely accessible. Where these objects autonomously manage themselves without the danger of spinning out of control. A world that has built-in prevention mechanisms for pitfalls of the past such as power centralization. In short, a richer, fairer and more comfortable world that will improve our lives.

Media2B is building that world by running contributing software companies.

Hugo, a Fanbase and (email) Campaign Management platform for Organizers of Events and Festivals to measure expectation, experience and involvement of (potential) event visitors.

Paylogic is the fastest growing ticketing company in Europe with a realized growth of 2600% in 5 years. Over 20 million tickets have been sold by events in over 20 countries to visitors from over 150 countries. Paylogic’s mission statement: “To redesign the world of ticketing with creative and reliable ticketing solutions which empower the event organizer in their relation with their visitors.”

We are a team of 35 nerds and one Stormtrooper (Fred). Next to gaming, we create trailblazing software for efficient and personal business communication. What sets us apart is our love for open source software, a quite experimental organization model without management and our precious arcade games. Does this sound like a place you want to spend your day? Take your future a leap forward and join our team!

Catawiki is an online auction house for buying and selling special items and collectibles. Catawiki has been curating weekly auctions since 2011, across a number of categories such as art, books, curiosa, model trains, stamps, wine and classic cars.

Silver

Bronze

Former Speakers

2015

2014

  • Jeff Knupp - Writing idiomatic Python (keynote)
  • Armin Ronacher - SSL, CAs and keeping your stuff safe
  • Kenneth Reitz - Documentation is King
  • Kilian Evang - Produce: Makefiles without the annoying bits
  • Pawel Lewicki - Sphinx + Robot Framework = documentation as result of functional testing
  • Rodrigo Bernardo Pimentel - A first look at async.io
  • Guido Kollerie - Slice & Dice: Data Analysis using Pandas
  • Erik Romijn - Keeping Django chained: top security concerns for Django websites
  • Valerio Basile - Bad habits in academic code
  • Gijs Molenaar - SQLAlchemy and astronomical data
  • Dmitrijs Milajevs - Python for data scientists
  • Oscar Vilaplana - Scaling your system
  • Panel - Dangers of centralization. Options and solutions
  • Saul Ibarra Corretge - asyncio internals
  • Avi Flax - The impedance mismatch of web microframeworks
  • Denis Bilenko - Gevent, threads & async frameworks
  • Berco Beute - Python friends: CoffeeScript & AngularJS
  • Job Ganzevoort & Douwe van der Meij - From zero to hero - Professional Django setup, deploy and maintain
  • Dirk Zittersteyn - Advanced continuous integration
  • Kenneth Reitz - Growing Open Source Seeds
  • Henk Doornbos - Processes, Data and the rest
  • Greg Kowal - Geoprocessing with python
  • Artur Barseghyan - Modern authentication in Python web applications

2013

  • Holger Krekel - Re-inventing Python packaging & testing (keynote)
  • Daniël & Gideon de Kok - What Python can learn from Haskell
  • Luuk van der Velden - Best practices for the lone coder syndrome
  • Peter Odding - Reliable deployment of large Python applications
  • Oscar Vilaplana - Handling massive traffic with Python
  • Álex González - Python and Scala smoke the peace pipe
  • Berco Beute - REST API design
  • Armin Ronacher - A year with MongoDB
  • Oleg Pidsadnyi - Behaviour driven design with PyTest
  • Remco Wendt - Component architectures in Python
  • Mark Vletter - Lean prototyping
  • Emil Loer - Python raytracing
  • Douwe van der Meij - MVC revisited with Diazo
  • Jan-Jaap Driessen - Fan/theme
  • Gijs Molenaar - LOFAR <3 Python
  • Alessandro Molina - High Performance Web Applications with Python and TurboGears
  • Dmitrijs Milajevs - Real Time discussion retrieval from Twitter
  • Kenneth Reitz - Python for humans

2012

  • Michael Bayer - SQLAlchemy (keynote)
  • Bram Noordzij - Amazon Web Services. The good, bad & ugly
  • Alexandros Kanterakis - PyPedia
  • Oleg Pidsadnyi - Large number of markers on Google Maps
  • Emil Loer - Musical Python
  • Douwe van der Meij - AOP in Python API design
  • Remco Wendt - Profiling
  • Miguel Araujo - Django Uni-forms
  • Henk Doornbos & Berco Beute - Chronic Pythonic
  • Ivor Bosloper - GeoDjango
  • Oscar Vilaplana - Tornado in depth
  • Laurence de Jong - Continuous integration
  • Alexander Solovyov - Go: Python + /theme typing?
  • Niels Hageman - Distributed job scheduling
  • Armin Ronacher - A fresh look at HTTP from Python
  • Reinout van Rees - Optimize & automate your Python life
  • Dan Tofan & Spyros Ioakeimidis - Python tools for making architectural decisions
  • Rick Oost - Generalized traversals

2011

  • Armin Ronacher - The state of Python and the web (keynote)
  • Henk Doorbos - Making large, untested code bases testable
  • Reinout van Rees - Practical project automation
  • Jobert Abma - The ten commandments of Security
  • Berco Beute - Growing up Pythonically
  • Alexander Solovyov - hg and complex development processes
  • Òscar Vilaplana - ØMQ
  • Pieter Noordhuis - Redis in practice
  • Duco Dokter - NLTK: natural language processing with Python
  • Gideon de Kok & Tom de Vries - Mobile Architectures
  • Kim Chee Leong - Buildout
  • Emil Loer - Embeddng Python interpreter in Ruby and vice versa
  • Rix Groenboom - MijnOverheid: performance testing in practice

2010

  • Ivan Sagalaev (keynote)
  • Ivan Metzlar
  • Erik Huisman & Aldert Greydanus
  • Michiel Prins & Jobert Abma
  • Tom de Vries & Gideon de Kok
  • Oscar Vilaplana
  • Oleg Pidsadnyi
  • Merijn Terheggen - Minimal Viable Products
  • Henk Doornbos - Python and hardware programming
  • Berco Beute - A Python's Life?
  • Bart jan Wesselink - Advanced Payment Routing
  • Tim Bakker - Green Parking

Photographic Moments of PyGrunn 2015

Movies 2015

Movies 2014

Jeff Knupp - Keynote: Writing Idiomatic Python

Armin Ronacher - SSL, CAs and keeping your stuff safe

Avi Flax - The impedance mismatch of Web Microframeworks

Saúl Ibarra Corretgé - asyncio internals

Oscar Vilaplana - Scaling your system

Panel Discussion - Dangers of centralization. Options and solutions.